“A Typical Heart” – this documentary film pulls no punches!

by Carolyn Thomas   @HeartSisters     July 15 , 2019

SEPTEMBER 7thFilm Screening/Panel Discussion in Victoria, BC!

Just launched on July 15th, the important documentary film called A Typical Heart is a triumph. It’s about the deadly disparity in diagnosis, treatment and outcomes among male and female heart patients. It packs an incredible load of unforgettable factoids and quotable quotes into just 22 short minutes.     .

Eight patients were interviewed about their own heart stories (I was pleased to be included in this group of women – thank you to York Region paramedic/co-producer Cristina D’Allessandro for inviting me to participate!) as well as several remarkable experts who clearly explain valuable heart lessons to women – and to their colleagues.

Please watch it, like it, and then share this film with all of the women you care about. A Typical Heart was directed by Chris Beauchamp and Laura Beauchamp of Distillery Film Company; written by Chris Beauchamp and Cristina D’Allessandro; produced by Chris Beauchamp, Laura Beauchamp and Cristina D’Allessandro, who won a $50,000 StoryHive award from Telus to create this film.

A Typical Heart documentary

Watch the official film trailer for A Typical Heart.

FILM SCREENING EVENT UPDATE: If you live on the West Coast of Canada, please join us on Saturday, September 7th for a free film screening and panel discussion of A Typical Heart at St. George’s Church in Cadboro Bay in Victoria, BC. Three of the eight heart patients interviewed in the film – Laurie Blakely, Zarina Vicenzino and Carolyn Thomas – will be participating in this panel on women’s heart health. The event moderator is Barb Field, retired Cardiac Social Worker at the Royal Jubilee Hospital.

Admission is free but space is limited: register early to reserve your seat.

Q: What’s your response to watching this documentary film?

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NOTE FROM CAROLYN:   I wrote much more about the cardiology gender gap in my book, “A Woman’s Guide to Living with Heart Disease” . You can ask for it at your local library or favourite bookshop, or order it online (paperback, hardcover or e-book) at Amazon, or order it directly from my publisher, Johns Hopkins University Press (use the code HTWN to save 20% off the list price).

See also:

When Your “Significant EKG Changes” are Missed

Yentl Syndrome: Cardiology’s Gender Gap is Alive and Well

How Does It Really Feel to Have a Heart Attack? Women Survivors Tell Their Stories

Diagnosis – and Misdiagnosis – of Women’s Heart Disease

14 Reasons To Be Glad You’re A Man When You’re Having a Heart Attack

His and Hers Heart Attacks

Heart Attack – or an Attack of Heartburn?

Is it a Heart Attack – or a Panic Attack?

What is Causing my Chest Pain?

When Your Doctor Mislabels You As an “Anxious Female”

Heart Disease: Not Just A Man’s Disease Anymore

How Doctors Discovered That Women Have Heart Disease, Too

Gender Differences in Heart Attack Treatment Contribute To Women’s Higher Death Rates

How a Woman’s Heart Attack is Different From A Man’s

 

9 thoughts on ““A Typical Heart” – this documentary film pulls no punches!

  1. Hi Carolyn,

    Wow, that was an incredible film. So well done. It was so moving to watch and listen to each woman tell her personal story. I was particularly moved by the woman whose heart disease had such a strong hereditary component since as you know, my family’s DNA is prone to cancer. So, I really related to her. Each woman’s story was compelling.

    You did a great job too! I am so impressed and proud of you for putting yourself out there in yet another venue. You are now a film star! But seriously, you are reaching more women every day and helping to break down those barriers that for years have prevented women from being properly diagnosed and treated. Educating and, as a result, saving lives.

    Bravo to all those involved!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your great review, Nancy. I’ll pass that on to the film’s producers – and thanks also for your kind words. It was a real honour to be invited to be one of the patients interviewed for such an important project.

      I thought that the patient narratives were just the right balance to the physicians/researchers. For me, it was the young Mums in the film who were especially compelling and moving). Plus the seven professional experts interviewed – so articulate and convincing! All in just 22 minutes!

      Please tell your friends – I’d love to see every woman out there watching and sharing this documentary.

      Like

  2. I loved this movie and shared it with my daughters and friends. I cried through the whole depression part. No one tells you that depression can take over your mind at any point after the trauma of heart attacks (and triple by-pass surgery in my case).

    Still fighting with depression a year after and now I am finally getting help. Thank God! And Dr Petsikis I am a survivor.

    Great short film every woman should watch! And show the men in your life so they can be more supportive!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The video is superb. All the key points were made, even the one about post “event” depression which is so important. What impressed me most is that an EMT was the instigator of this project.

    Having worked in the media I know this would have been tons of work, but she was obviously intensely motivated to get it on our screens. And how much do you want to bet that she did it while working full time at her highly-stressful day job, taking care of family commitments, and solving any outstanding issues related to nuclear fission?

    Thank you Cristina D’Allessandro.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Deborah – I’m going to pass on your comment to Cristina! I know she will really appreciate your empathy! Thank you for that…

      I too was astounded by all of the details that this little film did NOT miss. It would have been understandable to focus on the ‘big ticket’ cardiac issues for women, but this one also covered lesser known but critically important items from pregnancy complications to the VERY important but often ignored problem of situational depression following a cardiac event…

      It made me weep to see so many well respected healthcare professionals speak so eloquently about changing the system on our behalf. Wow….

      Like

  4. Thanks you, Carolyn, for all you do to fight the fight. I know this problem with gender bias for women in cardiac situations is not just happening in Canada. It happens in the U.S. too. A woman I was in cardiac rehab with in 2012 went to the Emergency Dept. THREE times at two different hospitals before they were finally convinced she was having heart issues.

    I was lucky – very lucky. I went to an Emergency Dept. that was a designated chest pain center and they took me very seriously right away. My symptoms of pressure and squeezing in the center of my chest along with aching in both jaws that came and went along with a panicky “impending sense of doom” feeling sent me there. At that time I was in denial that it could be anything serious. Thanks to my decision to be seen at that chest pain center the 99% blockage in the “widowmaker” didn’t kill me.

    ALL women deserve to be taken seriously just as I was. More lives must not be lost .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are so right, Holly – this is a worldwide global problem! No women anywhere are immune to a healthcare system that has historically used only males as the primary research subjects. That sets the tone – from diagnosistic tools to treatment decisions to poorer outcomes.

      I too once met a woman who had been turned away from Emergency THREE TIMES (the third time, they suggested she might want to consider taking anti-anxiety meds, and the 4th time was for double bypass surgery…)

      Liked by 1 person

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