Tag Archives: Heart Sisters

The 2018 Summer Blogging Challenge

12 Aug

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by Carolyn Thomas  ♥  @HeartSisters    August 12, 2018

My blogging friend Nancy Stordahl, author of several books about breast cancer, including (best title ever!) “Cancer is Not a Gift and it Didn’t Make Me a Better Person”, as well as the excellent breast cancer blog Nancy’s Point, sent me a little nudge this week. Perfect timing for an invitation to participate in her 4th Annual Summer Blogging ChallengeIt’s hot outside, I’m cranky, I’ve attempted writing half a dozen blog posts this week  yet abandoned all of them – maybe Nancy’s challenge will help me feel unstuck.

Her invitation: just answer the following 12 questions about being a blogger (or about the blogs you enjoy reading). Feel free to accept her challenge yourself. Continue reading

Meet 2009 ‘Women’s Health Heroes’

28 Jun

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by Carolyn Thomas  ♥   @HeartSisters

Last month, I was thrilled to learn that the legendary women’s health collective Our Bodies, Ourselves in Boston had named me one of their 2009 ‘Women’s Health Heroes’ – one of 20 inductees honoured from seven countries, each of us involved in some form of community activism to promote women’s health.

My own efforts (helping to raise women’s awareness of heart disease – our #1 killer – through public presentations and through Heart Sisters, the website you’re now visiting) seem to pale in comparison to the stellar accomplishments of the other 19 Women’s Health Heroes for 2009.

Let’s meet them here:  click to continue reading

Preventing women’s top 10 health threats

20 Jun

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Heart disease is the #1 killer of women in North America.  But it’s not the only threat that is deadly for us.  Our most serious – yet largely preventable – health threats are:

  • 1. heart disease
  • 2. cancer – particularly lung cancer
  • 3. stroke
  • 4. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)
  • 5. Alzheimer’s disease
  • 6. motor vehicle accidents
  • 7. type 2 diabetes
  • 8. influenza
  • 9. kidney disease
  • 10. blood poisoning

Find out more from Mayo Clinic about prevention tips for these top 10 killers.

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Are you a priority in your own life?

8 Jun

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by Carolyn Thomas  @HeartSisters

When I attended the WomenHeart Science & Leadership Symposium for Women With Heart Disease at Mayo Clinic, cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes (founder of the Mayo Women’s Heart Clinic) told us about a 2000 study on women’s life priorities called “Hierarchy of Female Concerns” that asked its female participants this one question:

“What is most important to you?”

Now, when I do presentations about women’s heart health, I like to ask my audiences to guess in advance the correct order of this study’s top six answers, just for fun.

These rankings are surprising, in an amusing-yet-oddly-pathetic way.  The order of our reported priorities may also help to explain why, even when women are experiencing deadly heart attack symptoms, they will delay seeking treatment if something ‘more important’ crops up.

‘More important? What could possibly be more important when you’re having a heart attack? Check out the terrific film “Just a Little Heart Attack” for a great example of our treatment-seeking delay behaviour.

And then see if this list of women’s reported priorities matches the answers that you might give, too: keep reading…

“You look great!” – and other things you should never say to heart patients

1 Jun

by Carolyn Thomas  ♥  @HeartSisters

“Wow!  You look great!  You look just the same!”

In the early days, that was a fairly typical greeting from those who had not seen me for a while.  While some might assume that this is a thoughtful and flattering comment to offer a freshly-diagnosed heart attack survivor, many times it didn’t feel that way.

Surprised? Many people, especially in the early days, weeks and months while still reeling emotionally and physically from their life-altering cardiac train wreck, tell me that they often feel like replying to such greetings with:

“I am NOT the same!”

Instead of  the well-meant but oddly niggling “You look great!” – what might be more helpful to the freshly-diagnosed heart patient?   click to continue reading