Scary times: living with (but not IN) fear 

by Carolyn Thomas      @HeartSisters

This is my 863rd blog post here on Heart Sisters. That’s a lot of articles.  Almost all of them so far are about women’s heart disease, or translating emerging cardiac research into plain language, or what it’s like for women when we suddenly become heart patients, or when we’re mistakenly told that our heart disease is not heart disease.

Never in the 11 years that I’ve been writing this blog have I felt like I’d run out of All Things Cardiac to write about.  Until today.             . Continue reading “Scary times: living with (but not IN) fear “

COVID-19: Can facts help to minimize fears?

by Carolyn Thomas      @HeartSisters

Waiting for the other shoe to drop. The expression dates back to the early 1900s, from the description of hearing the loud ‘thump’ of an upstairs apartment neighbour loudly dropping one shoe onto a bedroom floor. It’s that state of suspended focus. Waiting. Waiting. Not knowing when that other shoe upstairs will finally drop so that you can roll over and go quietly back to sleep.

But you can’t know exactly when or even if you’ll hear that second ‘thump’. You can’t predict that outcome, any more than we can predict the emerging outcomes of our current COVID-19 virus scare. And waiting for outcomes can feel exhausting.     .    Continue reading “COVID-19: Can facts help to minimize fears?”

“Let’s all be palm trees together” in facing COVID-19

A guest post this week from Walk With A Doc* – because this says what I’ve been trying to say about feeling helpless and worried during the COVID-19 viral outbreak.
Unprecedented suckiness going on right now, there is NO doubt.
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We’re all seeing the same news and it’s shocking us all, every hour.
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When things go sideways, it never hurts to receive a care package.
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We tried to throw one together for you.     .

How soon are heart patients safely fit to fly?

plane-drawing

by Carolyn Thomas    @HeartSisters

Five months after my heart attack, I boarded a plane from the West Coast bound for Rochester, Minnesota.  Considering that I’d suffered two horrific cardiac events on another long flight just five months earlier made this trip just a wee bit terrifying for me.

Only the reality that I was headed to the world-famous Mayo Clinic in Rochester helped propel me onboard. I told myself that if anything happened to me and my heart during this flight, the board-certified cardiologists at the Mayo Women’s Heart Clinic would know exactly what to do for me. If I survived the flight, that is . . .   Continue reading “How soon are heart patients safely fit to fly?”