Tag Archives: Dr. Jeff Clark

Why patient stories actually matter

10 Aug

Most of our medical visits start with some variation of this opening question: “Why are you here today?” Connecting with and understanding patients thus requires doctors to listen to what’s called the patient narrative.  The importance of really hearing this narrative is beautifully described by U.K. physician Dr. Jeff Clark, writing in the British Journal of General PracticeBut the problem, as Dr. Clark reminds his peers, is that patients and doctors see the world in very different ways.  He also warns that the stories patients tell their physicians about why they’re seeking medical care may all too often be seen by doctors as merely a time-wasting distraction from “getting to the bottom of things.

The urge to get to the bottom of things may also help to explain what’s known as “The 18-Second Rule”.
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Just not listening – or “narrative incompetence”?

22 Mar

by Carolyn Thomas  @HeartSisters

The Radical EarI’ve been reading lately about something called the patient’s narrative in medicine. Although it’s basically defined as patients telling the story of what originally brought them to see the doctor, it’s actually much more.

Doctors, for example, all too often may see “the story” as an unnecessarily lengthy distraction from getting swiftly to diagnosis and treatment.

But as U.K. physician Dr. Jeff Clark describes it, connecting with and understanding the patient requires a doctor to appreciate each person’s unique perspective. In the December 2008 issue of The British Journal of General Practice, he asked other doctors to consider how not listening to a patient’s story can be compared to his colleague’s golf game:  Continue reading