Tag Archives: worried well

If you’re clueless and you know it . . .

12 Feb

I am clueless about many things. As in the definition: “Lacking understanding or knowledge.” As in the sentence: “I have no clue!” As in the 20+ years I spent living with a research scientist and enduring mind-numbingly torturous dinner party conversations about zinc and copper sediment in the Fraser River estuary.

That kind of clueless.
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Self-tracking device? Got it. Tried it. Ditched it.

3 Apr

by Carolyn Thomas    @HeartSisters

It took a while to improve upon the humble little pedometer. This wearable device, typically attached on or near one’s waist, has been tracking how many steps and how much distance we travel each day ever since its invention by Abraham-Louis Perrelet back in 1780.

But with the relatively recent explosion of wearable digital activity trackers on the market, I’m now waiting for the randomized control trial that compares those fancy-schmancy new devices head to head with that simple old-fashioned pedometer. In other words:

Q:  Just because you make it digital, does it make it better? 
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Patient engagement as described by 31 non-patients

6 Jul

by Carolyn Thomas  @HeartSisters

I was one of the patients interviewed for the recently published Center for Advancing Health 2014 report called Here to Stay: What Health Care Leaders Say About Patient Engagement.  It’s an interesting, illuminating and frustrating document to read.

The late Dr. Jessie Gruman, president and founder of the CFAH, wrote in her forward to this report:

“What are people talking about when they say ‘patient engagement’ anyway?  That phrase encompasses so many concepts and ideas that it’s become meaningless.”

As I said here in 2012, my own concern (as a person who’s pretty darned engaged in my own health care) is not that the phrase is meaningless. It’s more that non-patients, business and industry have co-opted the concept of patient engagement for their own purposes.

And consider also that, even in this impressive 170-page CFAH document that is all about patient engagement, there were only four patients interviewed – compared to 31 clinicians, employers/purchaser representatives, community health leaders, government organizations, health plans, vendors, health care contractors and consultants.
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‘Healthy Privilege’ – when you just can’t imagine being sick

13 Apr

by Carolyn Thomas   ♥  @HeartSisters

Have you had the experience of knowing something intuitively, but without realizing that the thing you know already has a name?  For example, have you ever found yourself limping along on the losing end of an argument, yet  only much later (when it was far too late!) you suddenly thought of just the perfectly witty retort that you should have come up with? 

There’s a name for that. The French call this l’esprit d’escalier’, literally “the wit of the staircase”. You’re welcome.

Similarly, I’ve been writing for some time about my niggling frustration over something else that I didn’t even realize had an actual name.  Continue reading

Too embarrassed to call 911 during a heart attack?

12 Mar

by Carolyn Thomas  @HeartSisters

When I was sent home from the Emergency Department with a misdiagnosis of acid reflux, I felt horribly embarrassed that I’d made such a fuss over nothing (well, nothing but textbook heart attack symptoms like chest pain, nausea, sweating and pain radiating down my left arm).  It then took me two full weeks of increasingly debilitating cardiac symptoms before I forced myself to return to that same hospital, desperately ill yet still not completely certain this could be heart-related. After all, hadn’t an Emergency physician with the letters M.D. after his name told me quite emphatically:

“This is NOT your heart!”

It was only when my symptoms became truly unbearable that I knew I had to go back to the E.R. This extreme reluctance to get help is what doctors call treatment-seeking delay behaviour, and in the middle of a heart attack, it can be a deadly delay. We already know that the average person in mid-heart attack will wait four hours before getting medical help.  Why? One reason may well be that we’re too simply too embarrassed to attract attention to ourselves during a heart attack.   Continue reading