A rock drummer’s take on atrial fibrillation

6 Oct

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The incidence of atrial fibrillation increases as we age, so be on notice, you Baby Boomers. It’s the most common heart rhythm condition, and it’s also the most common heart-related reason for hospital admission. And as shown in this 90-second Heart and Stroke Foundation film (featuring Toronto musician and former Our Lady Peace drummer Jeremy Taggart, author of Canadianity: Tales from the True North Strong and Freezing), we should all know more about this heart rhythm condition which can triple our risk of stroke. 

Some people diagnosed with A-fib may feel absolutely nothing, while others experience a range of symptoms (such as the oft-heard complaint: “I feel like there’s a fish flopping around in my chest!”).

A-fib symptoms may include:

  • Irregular and fast heartbeat
  • Heart palpitations or a rapid thumping in the chest
  • Chest discomfort, chest pain or pressure
  • Shortness of breath, particularly with exertion or anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness, sweating or nausea
  • Light-headedness or fainting

For more on atrial fibrillation, visit cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. John Mandrola’s helpful website.

Q: Have you or somebody you know been diagnosed with A-fib?.

4 Responses to “A rock drummer’s take on atrial fibrillation”

  1. AFibDad October 28, 2012 at 7:07 am #

    Wow. You got reTweeted by Our Lady Peace. Cool . . . Glad that Jeremy stepped up to do this PSA for the H&SF.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Carolyn Thomas October 28, 2012 at 5:01 pm #

      I think it’s cool too! I’ve been telling my grown kids for years how cool their mother is . . . 😉

      Like

  2. Genevieve Fire October 12, 2012 at 9:59 pm #

    Read the sanitized version of my 14 year journey with AF.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Carolyn Thomas October 13, 2012 at 7:05 am #

      Hi Genevieve and thanks for this link. Your story is a good example of how AFib symptoms can come and go for years before finally being correctly diagnosed, and also that treatment (ablation in your case) may not be a one-shot “cure”. So glad you are doing much better now!

      Like

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